Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA)

Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement

 

The Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (‘the Agreement’ or EADRA) is a unique contractual arrangement signed in 2002 that brings together the Australian, state and territory governments and livestock industry groups to collectively and significantly increase Australia’s capacity to prepare for—and respond to—emergency animal disease (EAD) incursions.

The represented industries and government bodies that form the signatories for the agreement are:

  • Australian Animal Health Council Limited
  • Commonwealth of Australia
  • The State of Queensland
  • The State of New South Wales
  • The State of Victoria
  • The State of South Australia
  • The State of Tasmania
  • The State of Western Australia
  • The Northern Territory of Australia
  • The Australian Capital Territory
  • Australian Chicken Meat Federation Inc.
  • Australian Egg Corporation Limited
  • Australian Dairy Farmers Limited
  • Cattle Council of Australia
  • Australian Pork Limited
  • Sheepmeat Council of Australia Inc.
  • WoolProducers Australia
  • Australian Lot Feeders’ Association Inc.
  • Goat Industry Council of Australia
  • Racing Australia Limited
  • Harness Racing Australia Inc.
  • Australian Horse Industry Council
  • Equestrian Australia Limited

The EADRA is a cost-sharing deed between Government and livestock industries in the even that there were an emergency animal disease outbreak.

“The main benefit of the Agreement is the ability to respond quickly and effectively to an EAD incident while minimising uncertainty over management and funding arrangements.”

For more information, please visit EAD response agreement, or to view the agreement, please click here.

Frequently Asked Questions

There are 66 diseases organised into 4 categories that fall under the EADRA:

Category 1

These are EADs that predominantly seriously affect human health and/or the environment (depletion of native fauna) but may only have minimal direct consequences to the livestock industries.

Category 2

These are EADs that have the potential to cause major national socio-economic consequences through very serious international trade losses, national market disruptions and very severe production losses in the livestock industries that are involved. This category includes diseases that may have a slightly lower national socio-economic consequences, but also have significant public health and/or environmental consequences.

Category 3

These are EADs that have the potential to cause significant (but generally moderate) national socio-economic consequences through international trade losses, market disruptions involving two or more states and severe production losses to affected industries, but have minimal or no effect on human health or the environment.

Category 4

These are EADs that could be classified as being mainly production loss diseases. While there may be international trade losses and local market disruptions, these would not be of a magnitude that would be expected to significantly affect the national economy. The main beneficiaries of a successful emergency response to an outbreak of such a disease would be the affected livestock industry(s).

The EADs which have been categorised (classified) as at the Commencement Date are as follows:

Category 1

  • Australian bat lyssavirus
  • Japanese encephalitis
  • Nipah virus
  • rabies
  • Western, Eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis

Category 2

  • avian influenza (highly pathogenic; virus subtypes H5 and H7)
  • bovine spongiform encephalopathy
  • brucellosis (due to Brucella abortus)
  • brucellosis (due to Brucella melitensis)
  • foot-and-mouth disease
  • glanders
  • Hendra virus
  • peste des petits ruminants
  • Rift Valley fever
  • rinderpest
  • screw worm fly
  • sheep and goat pox
  • vesicular stomatitis

Category 3

  • African horse sickness
  • African swine fever
  • anthrax (major outbreaks)
  • avian influenza (highly pathogenic; other than virus subtypes H5 and H7)
  • avian influenza (low pathogenic; virus subtypes H5 and H7)
  • bluetongue
  • classical swine fever
  • contagious bovine pleuropneumonia
  • encephalitides (tick-borne)
  • lumpy skin disease
  • Menangle virus (porcine paramyxovirus)
  • Newcastle disease
  • scrapie
  • swine vesicular disease
  • trichinellosis
  • vesicular exanthema

Category 4

  • Aujeszky’s disease
  • Borna disease
  • bovine tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis
  • contagious equine metritis
  • dourine
  • east coast fever
  • epizootic lymphangitis
  • equine babesiosis
  • equine encephalosis
  • equine influenza
  • Getah virus
  • haemorrhagic septicaemia
  • heartwater
  • infectious bursal disease (hypervirulent form)
  • Jembrana disease
  • maedi-visna
  • Nairobi sheep disease
  • porcine epidemic diarrhoea
  • porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS)
  • Potomac fever
  • pulmonary adenomatosis
  • sheep scab
  • surra
  • swine influenza
  • Teschen disease
  • transmissible gastroenteritis
  • Wesselsbron disease

Under EADRA sheep are susceptible carrying and transmitting the following diseases:

  • foot-and-mouth disease
  • rinderpest
  • swine vesicular disease
  • vesicular exanthema
  • vesicular stomatitis*
  • anthrax (major outbreaks)
  • bluetongue
  • heartwater
  • Rift Valley fever
  • screw worm fly
  • brucellosis (due to Brucella melitensis)
  • encephalitides (tick-borne)
  • maedi-visna
  • Nairobi sheep disease
  • peste des petits ruminants
  • pulmonary adenomatosis
  • scrapie
  • sheep and goat pox
  • sheep scab
  • Wesselsbron disease

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Australian Animal Welfare Standards & Guidelines

Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines

In terms of animal welfare, each state is governed under its own Act, as follows:

State Animal Welfare Act 
ACT Animal Welfare Act 1992
NSW Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1979
NT Animal Welfare Act
Qld Animal Care and Protection Act 2001
SA Animal Welfare Act 1985
Tas Animal Welfare Act 1993
Vic Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1986
WA Animal Welfare Act 2002

For further detail visit: Department of Agriculture and Water Resources

 

 

Standards & Guidelines

From the Australian Government: Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines

The states and territories are working to develop and implement nationally consistent animal welfare standards and guidelines.

Standards and guidelines for sheep, cattle, poultry, exhibited animals and for livestock at saleyards and depots are at various stages of development. Industry and community stakeholders are directly involved in the development process.

Standards and guidelines in development

Sheep

The Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Sheep are being developed using the principles described in the Standards and Guidelines Development Business Plan and are being drafted by a writing group with representatives from the:

  • state and territory governments
  • Sheepmeat Council of Australia and WoolProducers
  • CSIRO
  • Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

The group has an independent Chair, and is managed by Animal Health Australia.

See the Animal Welfare Standards website for more information.

Current standards and guidelines

Land transport of livestock

Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for the Land Transport of Livestock were developed using the Standards and Guidelines Development Business Plan, and the process was managed by Animal Health Australia.

The Standards were developed from seven Model Codes of Practice and provisions on livestock transport appearing in 13 other codes. They were endorsed by the former Standing Council on Primary Industries in May 2009 and are currently being implemented by the states and territories.

They cover the transport of livestock by road or rail. From an animal welfare perspective, this commences at the time that animals are first deprived of feed and water prior to loading, to the time that livestock have access to water (with the exception of day–old chicks and poultry sent for processing) at the completion of the journey (destination), and includes:

  • mustering and assembly
  • handling and waiting periods prior to loading
  • loading, journey duration, travel conditions, spelling periods
  • unloading and holding time.

The Standards apply to all people responsible for the care and management of livestock involved in the transport of livestock, including agents, transport operators, people on farms, at depots, saleyards, feedlots and processing plants. The Standards apply to the major commercial livestock species:

  • cattle
  • sheep
  • pigs
  • goats
  • poultry (broilers, layers, turkeys, ducks, geese)
  • ratites (emus and ostrich)
  • buffalo
  • deer
  • camels
  • alpacas and
  • horses (including horses used for sport and recreation).

See the Animal Welfare Standards website or the Animal Health Australia website for more information.

 

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National Farm Biosecurity Reference Manual

National Farm Biosecurity Reference Manual

‘The National Farm Biosecurity Reference Manual – Grazing Livestock Production is an important tool for meeting our shared responsibility for biosecurity. It has been developed to help reduce the risk to farming operations of disease entering a property, spreading through the livestock population, and/or being passed to surrounding livestock operations.’

Goals

1. To prevent the introduction of infectious diseases to grazing livestock production properties

2. To prevent the spread of diseases from an infected property to an uninfected property

What the manual is:

  • Voluntary
  • A broad set of guidelines addressing disease prevention and/or reduction on farm • Practical and cost effective
  • Developed through consultation using a science-based approach to reducing disease spread
  • For industry bodies to use as a reference document in designing their sector-specific on-farm plans

 

What the manual is NOT:

  • A list of ‘must do’s’
  • A prescriptive set of practices
  • Taken from another sector and redesigned for this application • Idealistic – developed without consultation, impractical or hard to implement
  • Expensive to implement

‘This manual sets out biosecurity practices for all grazing livestock enterprises. It is a reference document designed for use by all extensive grazing industries that will set an agreed level of biosecurity for their members.’

This manual is designed using livestock management principles and strategies to implement and achieve these strategies: a copy of the manual can be found here.

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Farm Biosecurity Resources

Farm Biosecurity Resources

farmbiosecurity.com.au ‘is providing practical information to help you protect your farm from biosecurity risks.’ –
farmbiosecurity.com.au is part of the Farm Biosecurity Program; a joint initiative of Animal Health Australia (AHA) and Plant Health Australia (PHA) managed on behalf of members

What is farm biosecurity?

Farm biosecurity is a set of measures designed to protect a property from the entry and spread of pests, diseases and weeds. Farm biosecurity is your responsibility, and that of every person visiting or working on your property.

Producers play a key role in protecting Australian plant and livestock industries from pests and diseases by implementing sound biosecurity measures on-farm.

If a new pest or disease becomes established on your farm, it will affect your business through increased costs (for monitoring, production practices, additional chemical use and labour), reduced productivity (in yield and/or quality) or loss of markets. Early detection and immediate reporting of an exotic pest or disease increases the chance of effective and efficient eradication.

The Farm Biosecurity program is an important part of Australia’s emergency animal disease and exotic plant pest surveillance systems. Surveillance allows us to preserve existing trade opportunities and provides evidence of Australia’s pest and animal disease status to support access to international markets.

If you spot anything unusual, call the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline 1800 084 881 or the Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline 1800 675 888.

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National Primary Industries RD&E Framework

National Primary Industries RD& E Framework

The National Primary Industries RD&E Framework was developed with the direct purpose to ‘facilitate greater coordination among the different Commonwealth, State governments, CSIRO, RDCs, industry and university sectors to better harmonise their roles in RD&E related to primary industries and assure that they work together effectively to maximise net benefits to Australia.’

The National Primary Industries RD&E subcommittee is responsible for developing RD&E strategies relating to all areas of primary industry, including;

  • Animal Welfare
  • Biosecurity
  • Wool RD&E
  • Sheep Meat RD&E

Animal Welfare RD&E Strategy

In 2017, a review of the Animal Welfare RD&E Strategy was undertaken and a revised edition of the strategy released in August 2017. This Strategy was prepared by the Steering Committee of the National Primary Industries Animal Welfare RD&E Strategy, chaired by Alan Tilbrook and comprising the major investors and providers of animal welfare RD&E.

The broad aims of the Animal Welfare RD&E Strategy are to provide:

  1. Leadership for animal welfare R&D issues in the livestock industries;
  2. Collaborative co-investment platform for investment in cross sectoral animal welfare R,D&E for agriculture;
  3. Maintain a register of animal welfare R&D activities and outcomes by the various sectoral interests
  4. National arrangements to deliver strong collaboration amongst existing RD&E provider groups, and effective partnership between investors and providers.

The Strategy is broken into six themes:

  1. Animal Welfare Assessment
  2. Pain Assessment & Management
  3. Management, Housing & Husbandry
  4. Transport, Euthanasia & Slaughter Impacts
  5. Attitudinal Effects on the Welfare of Livestock throughout the Value Chain
  6. Education, Training & Extension

‘Animal welfare R, D&E is a high priority for all livestock industry RDCs and all are planning to either increase or maintain their current levels of investment in this area. The Strategy provides a key opportunity for the RDCs to efficiently invest in high priority, cross-sectoral, collaborative projects’

To view the 2017 revised copy: Animal Welfare RD&E Strategy

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Drugs & Alcohol in the Shearing Industry

Drugs & Alcohol in the Shearing Industry

In May 2017, the Wool Industry Stakeholder’s Reference Group held a summit to address Drugs & Alcohol in the Shearing Industry. The summit was designed to align with the ongoing work of the reference group and focus on concerns raised by industry regarding the impact of drugs and alcohol on OH&S and industry reputation.

The Stakeholder Reference Group consists of:

  • WoolProducers Australia (WPA);
  • The Shearing Contractors Association of Australia (SCAA);
  • The Australian Wool Exchange (AWEX); and
  • The WA Shearing Industry Association (WASIA)
  • The National Farmers’ Federation (NFF); and
  • The Australian Workers’ Union (AWU).

The group was formed to support farmers, contractors, shearers and shed staff when responding to reports of workplace health and safety risks involving alcohol and drugs through the development of practical guidance materials. The ultimate aim being to protect the farmer, the shearing contractor and the employee from safety issues that arise when someone turns up to work under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

The Summit provided an opportunity for the group to bring together the broader wool industry, provide an update of current work and facilitate feedback.

The group is working on the development of policy for managing drug and alcohol use in the workplace, as presented at the Summit. The remoteness of many properties on which shearing is conducted, combined with the multi-layer structure of the workforce can create confusion around who has responsibility for enforcement, who bears costs and who carries liability. The development of a policy to address this will provide important guidance for all parties to the shearing operation and is a tool that property owners and contractors can utilise to address concerns.

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Wool levy payers may be paying twice – WoolProducers Australia

Wool levy payers may be paying twice – WoolProducers Australia

Wool levy payers needed to ask if they were again paying for genetic data they had previously funded under Sheep Genetics Australia (SGA) and consider the question of how vital R&D programs were being funded.

This was the view today of WoolProducers’ Australia CEO, Jo Hall, who said it would be ‘disappointing’ to learn wool growers may have to ‘pay retail’ for access to analytical data they had previously part-funded.

AWI contentiously withdrew its share of funding for the SGA management agreement with fellow R&D provider Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) last year.

The agreement had meant that wool growers through AWI, had contributed half of the development costs for a range of genetic programs including MERINOSELECT, the genetics evaluation program for Merino sheep.

“WPA has always had concerns that the long-term consequences of AWI ceasing to fund the genetics program had not been properly considered,” Ms Hall said.

In its submission to the 2014 public consultation into Genetic Benchmarking: Potential for Further Commercialisation of AWI-funded or part-funded projects after June 2015, WPA supported an operationally expanded version of the program

Under this proposal, breeders would pay for private-good and MLA and AWI would fund public-good R&D and the two would continue jointly managing Sheep Genetics Australia.

“At the time WPA urged AWI to continue investment in genetic benchmarking services, Sheep Genetics, MERINOSELECT and AMSEA,” Ms Hall said.

“Collaboration between traditional and scientific approaches to benchmarking was to be encouraged and needed to be pursued.”

Following the public consultation in 2014, levy payer feedback delivered a clear mandate for ongoing investment. AWI then commissioned a separate economic assessment of its investment in genetics and found a negative return on investment.

The economic report conducted by BDA Group was widely criticised at the time for not appropriately valuing genetic gain and the basis of the assumptions used.

Since the decision was made by AWI that investment in SGA would cease they have launched Merino Lifetime Productivity, which relies on data analysis through OVIS – now managed solely by Meat and Livestock Australia.

‘WoolProducers Australia hopes that there is a way for this genetic data to be accessed on behalf of wool growers for future programs without them having to pay twice.” Ms Hall said.

ENDS

WoolProducers Australia contact:

Jo Hall

Chief Executive Officer

0488 554 811


Expressions of Interest Extended- National Sheep Industries Biosecurity Strategy

 

 

Expressions of Interest Extended- National Sheep Industries Biosecurity Strategy

WoolProducers Australia in conjunction with Sheep Producers Australia wish to advise that expressions of interest have been extended for the National Sheep Industries Biosecurity Strategy and are calling for proposals by close of business 20th of December 2017.

The National Sheep Industry Biosecurity Strategy will build the awareness and capacity of Australia’s sheep and wool producers to protect their properties and animals from the entry and spread of pests, disease and weeds. The Strategy will facilitate the improvement of sound on-farm biosecurity measures while enhancing Australia’s reputation as a producer of food and fibre that is safe and ethically produced.

More broadly, an effective biosecurity strategy provides an environmental and economic benefit, and consequently a public good, through higher levels of awareness, surveillance and improved response arrangements that reduces the impact and cost of a disease or pest incursion.

The development of the Sheep Industry Biosecurity Strategy provides an opportunity to review existing programs and tools that make up and contribute to the National biosecurity system and align them to form the basis of an effective biosecurity system that can be implemented by sheep producers while enhancing the credentials of the supply chain.

Please contact us, at info@woolproducers.com.au for further details of the project.