Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement

 

The Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (‘the Agreement’ or EADRA) is a unique contractual arrangement signed in 2002 that brings together the Australian, state and territory governments and livestock industry groups to collectively and significantly increase Australia’s capacity to prepare for—and respond to—emergency animal disease (EAD) incursions.

The represented industries and government bodies that form the signatories for the agreement are:

  • Australian Animal Health Council Limited
  • Commonwealth of Australia
  • The State of Queensland
  • The State of New South Wales
  • The State of Victoria
  • The State of South Australia
  • The State of Tasmania
  • The State of Western Australia
  • The Northern Territory of Australia
  • The Australian Capital Territory
  • Australian Chicken Meat Federation Inc.
  • Australian Egg Corporation Limited
  • Australian Dairy Farmers Limited
  • Cattle Council of Australia
  • Australian Pork Limited
  • Sheepmeat Council of Australia Inc.
  • WoolProducers Australia
  • Australian Lot Feeders’ Association Inc.
  • Goat Industry Council of Australia
  • Racing Australia Limited
  • Harness Racing Australia Inc.
  • Australian Horse Industry Council
  • Equestrian Australia Limited

The EADRA is a cost-sharing deed between Government and livestock industries in the even that there were an emergency animal disease outbreak.

“The main benefit of the Agreement is the ability to respond quickly and effectively to an EAD incident while minimising uncertainty over management and funding arrangements.”

For more information, please visit EAD response agreement, or to view the agreement, please click here.

Frequently Asked Questions

There are 66 diseases organised into 4 categories that fall under the EADRA:

Category 1

These are EADs that predominantly seriously affect human health and/or the environment (depletion of native fauna) but may only have minimal direct consequences to the livestock industries.

Category 2

These are EADs that have the potential to cause major national socio-economic consequences through very serious international trade losses, national market disruptions and very severe production losses in the livestock industries that are involved. This category includes diseases that may have a slightly lower national socio-economic consequences, but also have significant public health and/or environmental consequences.

Category 3

These are EADs that have the potential to cause significant (but generally moderate) national socio-economic consequences through international trade losses, market disruptions involving two or more states and severe production losses to affected industries, but have minimal or no effect on human health or the environment.

Category 4

These are EADs that could be classified as being mainly production loss diseases. While there may be international trade losses and local market disruptions, these would not be of a magnitude that would be expected to significantly affect the national economy. The main beneficiaries of a successful emergency response to an outbreak of such a disease would be the affected livestock industry(s).

The EADs which have been categorised (classified) as at the Commencement Date are as follows:

Category 1

  • Australian bat lyssavirus
  • Japanese encephalitis
  • Nipah virus
  • rabies
  • Western, Eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis

Category 2

  • avian influenza (highly pathogenic; virus subtypes H5 and H7)
  • bovine spongiform encephalopathy
  • brucellosis (due to Brucella abortus)
  • brucellosis (due to Brucella melitensis)
  • foot-and-mouth disease
  • glanders
  • Hendra virus
  • peste des petits ruminants
  • Rift Valley fever
  • rinderpest
  • screw worm fly
  • sheep and goat pox
  • vesicular stomatitis

Category 3

  • African horse sickness
  • African swine fever
  • anthrax (major outbreaks)
  • avian influenza (highly pathogenic; other than virus subtypes H5 and H7)
  • avian influenza (low pathogenic; virus subtypes H5 and H7)
  • bluetongue
  • classical swine fever
  • contagious bovine pleuropneumonia
  • encephalitides (tick-borne)
  • lumpy skin disease
  • Menangle virus (porcine paramyxovirus)
  • Newcastle disease
  • scrapie
  • swine vesicular disease
  • trichinellosis
  • vesicular exanthema

Category 4

  • Aujeszky’s disease
  • Borna disease
  • bovine tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis
  • contagious equine metritis
  • dourine
  • east coast fever
  • epizootic lymphangitis
  • equine babesiosis
  • equine encephalosis
  • equine influenza
  • Getah virus
  • haemorrhagic septicaemia
  • heartwater
  • infectious bursal disease (hypervirulent form)
  • Jembrana disease
  • maedi-visna
  • Nairobi sheep disease
  • porcine epidemic diarrhoea
  • porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS)
  • Potomac fever
  • pulmonary adenomatosis
  • sheep scab
  • surra
  • swine influenza
  • Teschen disease
  • transmissible gastroenteritis
  • Wesselsbron disease

Under EADRA sheep are susceptible carrying and transmitting the following diseases:

  • foot-and-mouth disease
  • rinderpest
  • swine vesicular disease
  • vesicular exanthema
  • vesicular stomatitis*
  • anthrax (major outbreaks)
  • bluetongue
  • heartwater
  • Rift Valley fever
  • screw worm fly
  • brucellosis (due to Brucella melitensis)
  • encephalitides (tick-borne)
  • maedi-visna
  • Nairobi sheep disease
  • peste des petits ruminants
  • pulmonary adenomatosis
  • scrapie
  • sheep and goat pox
  • sheep scab
  • Wesselsbron disease

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